Herston House

Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner
Herston house renovation, Brisbane architect Sullivan Skinner

Renovations to an existing low-set chamferboard-clad house on an inner Brisbane suburban site.

The floor level of the rear extension is elevated to maintain a clear pathway beneath the building for overland flow flooding.

Doubling the footprint of the original house on a narrow site presented two key design challenges: bringing daylight into a deep floor plan without compromising privacy from close neighbours, and augmenting a small house without resorting to the tragicomical extrusion of the original building’s proportions.

In response to these challenges, several design strategies combine to produce a light-filled home with unexpected spatial generosity.

Private rooms are consolidated along the long southern edge of the house, with the open living spaces sequenced along the northern edge creating a visual and physical link between the rear garden and a new courtyard at the front of the site.

Lofty uncluttered ceilings rise to a height of four metres. Rooms ‘borrow’ light from one another via fixed glass windows at a high level. The split-level floor and varying ceiling volumes provide visual relief to the 30-metre-long sequence of living spaces.

The pitched roof of the rear extension is oriented to present a low edge towards the street elevation allowing the new built form to recede behind the original house.

Project typePrivate residence
PhotographyDavid Chatfield

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